Learn English Network


Rudyard Kipling (1865 – 1936)


Rudyard Kipling
Source: Wiki
The Elephant's Child

Joseph Rudyard Kipling was born in Bombay, in British India, and went on to become a short-story writer, poet, and novelist chiefly remembered for his celebration of British imperialism, his tales and poems of British soldiers in India, and his tales for children.

He is best known for his works of fiction The Jungle Book (1894) (a collection of stories which includes Rikki-Tikki-Tavi), Kim (1901) (a tale of adventure), many short stories, including The Man Who Would Be King (1888); and his poems, including Mandalay (1890), Gunga Din (1890), and If— (1910).

Kipling was one of the most popular writers in English, in both prose and verse, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. His children's books are enduring classics of children's literature.

In 1907, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, making him the first English language writer to receive the prize, and to date he remains its youngest recipient. Among other honours, he was sounded out for the British Poet Laureateship and on several occasions for a knighthood, all of which he declined.

Kipling kept writing until the early 1930s, but at a slower pace and with much less success than before. He died of a perforated duodenal ulcer on 18 January 1936, at the age of 70. (His death had in fact previously been incorrectly announced in a magazine, to which he wrote, "I've just read that I am dead. Don't forget to delete me from your list of subscribers.")

At some time these poems, stories and books have been read, or will be read in the Learn English Book Club with Your Teacher online.

Feel free to explore the Network more.